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Asia-Pacific Security

Maritime Security Programme
Coordinator: Ms. Jane Chan

Research on maritime security at RSIS started in 2004 following increased concerns over the security of ports and sea lanes. The programme addresses issues of good order at sea, piracy and port security, and has built up a significant international reputation in these fields. Future research directions include coverage of the spectrum of maritime security issues ranging from traditional maritime security topics to non-traditional maritime security issues, adopt a comprehensive approach, as well as seek to provide an integrated response to maritime security issues. Traditional maritime security topics covered by the programme include the impact of force modernization on the regional balance of power, and maritime boundary disputes and their impact on regional stability. Non-traditional security topics comprise maritime terrorism, piracy, and other trans-boundary maritime crimes like arms smuggling, illicit drug and people smuggling, as well as safety at sea and disaster relief. Bridging the traditional and non-traditional security concerns are topics on maritime security cooperation and regime building, which are essential to enhancing confidence amongst the various stakeholders in co-managing the wide and complex array of maritime security challenges in the Asia-Pacific region.

Reports and Papers on Maritime Security Programme

 

Military Studies Programme
Coordinator: Mr Eddie Lim

Formerly known as the Revolutions in Military Affairs (RMA) Programme, the renamed programme were established in 2003. They aim to develop an indigenous scholarly and policy-relevant expertise on the theory and practice of military transformation, and to support the educational requirements of the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF). Their research agenda seeks to adapt existing literature on transformation towards the geopolitical conditions that relate to Singapore and the SAF, as well as other states and militaries in the Asia-Pacific region. Towards this end, the programmes focus on three broad areas of research: 1) transformation of doctrine, operational planning and strategy in the areas of network-centric war, effects-based operations, cyberwarfare, special operations, conventional military operations, and operations other than war; 2) transformation of defence economics and industrialization, namely, transformation in defence industries, defence industrial policies, management of technologies, trends and patterns in defence spending, acquisition processes and patterns, and management of human resources; and 3) national approaches to military transformation. The programmes also support the education requirements of the SAF through two flagship education enterprises. The first is the SAF Command and Staff Course, wherein the programmes are responsible for modules such as Strategic Studies, Campaigning and War Studies, and Maritime Security in Southeast Asia. The second is the Undergraduate Professional Military Education and Training enterprise, which the programmes conduct in partnership with the SAF-NTU Academy along with other colleges and schools at NTU.

 

Military Transformations Programme
Coordinator: Richard A. Bitzinger, Senior Fellow

Formerly known as the Revolutions in Military Affairs (RMA) Programme, the Military Transformations Programme (MTP) was established in 2003. The MTP aims to develop an in-house scholarly and policy-relevant expertise on the theory and practice of military transformation. MTP research is focused on three broad areas of work: 1) transformation of doctrine, operational planning and strategy in the areas of network-centric war, effects-based operations, cyberwarfare, special operations, conventional military operations, and operations other than war; 2) transformation of defence economics and industrialization, namely, transformation in defence industries, defence industrial policies, management of technologies, trends and patterns in defence spending, acquisition processes and patterns, and management of human resources; and 3) national approaches to military transformation, including military modernization activities in the Asia-Pacific and U.S. defense transformation as it affects the Asia-Pacific.

 

Multilateralism and Regionalism Programme
Coordinator: Associate Professor Ralf Emmers

The programme conducts advanced, cutting-edge research, networking and education in cooperative multilateralism and the evolving regional order and architecture in the Asia-Pacific. With the establishment of the Centre for Multilateralism Studies at RSIS in 2011, the programme has been informally integrated with the centre while maintaining its existence as a separate entity. It has been successful in securing substantial external grants for its research and networking work. Granters have included the MacArthur Foundation, Korea Foundation, Sasakawa Peace Foundation, ASEAN Secretariat, Friedrich Ebert Stiftung and others. Its broad research agenda includes: 1) regional defence and security institutions, such as ASEAN, ASEAN Regional Forum, ASEAN+3, East Asia Summit, ASEAN-Defence Ministers Meeting (ADMM) and ADMM+8, Shanghai Cooperation Organization, Six Party Talks, Northeast Asian Trilateral Summit; 2) defence alliances, especially the Five Power Defence Arrangements (FPDA); 3) nonofficial or second-track epistemic communities, such as the ASEAN Institutes of Strategic Studies (ASEAN-ISIS), the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific (CSCAP), the Network of ASEAN Defence and Security Institutions (NADI), and the Shangri-La Dialogue; and 4) other institutional forms in defence and security diplomacy. More recently, the programme has begun developing research capacity on regional economic cooperation and integration in East Asia.

 

 

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